Writing Prompt Sixty-Four


Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
      • Public contact information you would like me to reference if your piece should be selected for feature.
        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
        • Optional: A photo of you
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

Review: The Danger Mark

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Wealth, romance, adventure, and one woman's struggle with addiction. This 1909 novel is right on par with Robert W. Chambers' love of walking the edge of what was acceptable for society at the time and then taking one step farther with tactful grace.

Meet the Seagrave children - spoiled, wealthy, parentless twins who live under the tutelage of a governess and the indulging care of their household servants. As they age into young adulthood it becomes abundantly clear that their financial resources have been taken advantage of by their family's closest friend and executor of the estate. Though not penniless, they are certainly down on their luck and forced to re-examine their futures. With such a crisis on their hands, little is it noticed that the sister out of the pair has a deep secret, a dark mark which taints her.

Robert W. Chambers was my first favorite author and remains in the top rankings that list still today. He wrote in an era that was publicly shrouded in conservatism, modesty, and secrecy. What happened behind closed doors, stayed behind closed doors. That's what makes his writing so unique and stand out amongst the hundreds of other writers of his time. Every novel I have read of his has starred a heroine who was up against some unheard of dilemma - she shows cunning, strength, intelligence, femininity, and charm. In In Secret it was war and espionage, in The Danger Mark it's addiction.

Geraldine doesn't face just any addiction, though, she is up against a lifelong penchant for alcohol, having begun dosing herself with cologne (which had an alcohol content to some degree) when she was just a young girl in order to chase away her boredom blues. She battles her alcoholism alone, in secret, ashamed of her problem, often losing the fight. It isn't until she meets a young man who captures her heart that she decides to conquer the beast once and for all. But in order to do so she must overcome temptation, confession, and withdrawal. Yet, she did it for herself as much as she did it for him - she wanted to be in control, to be worthy, to be clean before accepting him into her life. She needed to rid herself of the dark mark hanging heavy in her mind.

Though not as great as In Secret, this is a thoroughly enjoyable read that will have you invested in the success of the characters within pages. It's particularly noteworthy for the sole fact that Chambers discusses such a taboo topic so openly and without apology, though he never comes out and says it directly. He knows the habits of addiction well enough to convey it to the reader rather than the write it off as some female weakness. Through Geraldine's battle with alcoholism and her strength to overcome it I am sure Chambers touched the lives of many young people of his time in such a way that no other would have because no one else dared speak of such personal matters.

Definitely worth reading! Not able to buy it? That's ok! It's available on the Gutenberg Project for free!

Writing Prompt Sixty-Three


Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
      • Public contact information you would like me to reference if your piece should be selected for feature.
        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
        • Optional: A photo of you
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

Writing Prompt Sixty-Two


Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
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        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
        • Optional: A photo of you
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

Writing Prompt Sixty-One


Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
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        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
        • Optional: A photo of you
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

Writing Prompt Sixty


Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
      • Public contact information you would like me to reference if your piece should be selected for feature.
        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
        • Optional: A photo of you
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

The Price of Being a Gypsy


Social media is a gift for keeping in touch with friends and family. As we get older and start building our own families it gets more and more difficult to find the time to spend one on one with those who matter most so being able to stay connected through photos and like buttons and statuses makes everything easier. It makes us feel like we are still involved and still important to those people in our lives.

It also makes a person homesick.

I'm approaching my thirtieth birthday with lightning speed and have incredible plans for my thirties - much of which includes writing, travel, school, and good health. But since turning eighteen I have been something of a roaming gypsy. Never staying anywhere too long, only long enough to build relationships and then leave them. It's not that I intentionally avoid letting moss grow on me, but somehow life has taken me to new places and new faces.

In the last eleven years I have lived in Oregon, Washington, Arizona, Oregon, and Wyoming. And soon I will be moving again. I have made best friends in each location, grown acquaintances into sisterhoods, found worthwhile work, and settled down for the long haul... only to pick up my shallow roots and move on. While there is a piece of me that wants to go home, it's hard to pick a home to go to. Tempe, Arizona? Roseburg, Oregon? Tacoma, Washington? Portland?

I watch my friends build their families. I watch my family grow closer together and me... well I'm not there to participate. I don't have inside jokes with my cousins - hell, I doubt they would recognize me if I passed them on the street! I'm not able to make it home for Christmas and the gift exchange. I feel pangs of jealousy as my mother grows closer to my cousin... or my brother to my father. There is a piece of my life that I'm completely missing out on. Always, I hear the tired advice: "if you miss it and want to be involved so much, why don't you come back?"

Come back. Like it is so easy. Even if I had the choice to do so, I doubt I would be able to stay for long. So I continue to wander and chase my dreams. I continue to watch through the glass of my monitor the lives of those I hold dear to me, but whom likely don't hold me so close.

There is a trade off, though - something that calls for me to be independent when, at times, I feel like a woman without a family; a woman without a home. In every new location I move to I have the damnedest luck of meeting inspiring, beautiful, incredible people. Families who have scooped me up and become my surrogate. So in turn, I have many sisters, many mothers, many fathers, and even a few brothers. I see the world openly and without exaggerated force. The thought of travel to far off places sparks a twinge of eager anticipation in the depths of my stomach that urges me to thrust out and explore.

It can be a lonely life, out on the far reaches of your world's sphere, but for me it is worth it.

I will say this, though. I miss the ocean.

Writing Prompt Fifty-Nine


Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
      • Public contact information you would like me to reference if your piece should be selected for feature.
        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
        • Optional: A photo of you
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

Review: I, Coriander

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Coriander Hobie is the daughter of an adoring mother and father who lives an early life of luxury and balance. The love between her parents is ethereal and romantic. Their days are filled with the beaming rays of a bright sun... until a long, dark shadow is cast beginning with the death of her mother. And from there, it seems, all the joy in the world is snuffed out for our young heroine.

Puritans, fairies, alligators, witches, and death lurk in all corners of this captivating young adult fiction. Once you pick it up, like a fairy's cruel trick, you won't be able to put it down!

This is a novel I have read time and time again for it's beauty and fearless delivery. Embrace your dormant imagination as you are whisked away to the 1640's - a time where magic and religion clashed with fierce results. I'll admit, the cover art is what put the book in my basket while I was shopping and I'm shameless in my confession. It's beautiful and oh so very fitting for what's written on the pages between the covers.

You will feel sorrow and joy, pain and anger, frustration and doubt. You will know the wrath of a liberated soul lashing out against the injustice of a preacher and be doubly thankful you live in the era in which you do. You will cry foul at the rotten teeth of a heartless step mother and be held captive in tender moments of friendship.

This is a great novel for young and old, boys and girls. Coriander is built strong and defiant, cunning and curious. Her statement alone, "I, Coriander," shows the value of her character - once you get to that part in the book, you'll know what I mean.

Add a little magic to your life and take this novel home. You'll be peeking around corners searching for magic creatures in no time!

Writing Prompt Fifty-Eight


Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
      • Public contact information you would like me to reference if your piece should be selected for feature.
        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
        • Optional: A photo of you
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

Artists: Know Your Value!

I'm going to make this straight to the point. There are a few reasons for the saying "starving artist"and one of those reasons is the common exchange of doing work for exposure. Often this is exposure given by a big name company so the opportunity seems amazing for the artist because of all the traffic flow to their website, store, or album. But exposure doesn't pay the rent, put food on the table, or gas in the car. Exposure doesn't pay school loans or put clothes on our backs. Exposure is good, yes, but you need to demand more.

Musicians, painters, writers, and creators need to stop accepting exposure over money if we are ever going to be able to collectively lift ourselves out of the shadows and into the limelight. Author and blogger Kristen Lamb recently posted about encouraging a boycott of the Huffington Post and I'm right on board with her. Here is a company who makes millions of dollars a year from advertising off the backs of unpaid contributors... and they are proud of it. Something's gotta change! I have my own soap box on this topic, so here we go...

Self-publishing authors, this is to you - stop listing your books for so cheap. You took time and energy to write your novel, novella, poetry, whatever; you invested your own money into the project. By permanently listing your books for free or at $0.99; you are bringing the whole literary world down with you. Stop it. Stop it right now. Put it on sale for cheap, that's fine, but why should you discount your work all the time. Demand more and value your work more. Please, I beg of you.


When we sell ourselves short by listing our work for free or at 10% of the cost of big name authors, musicians, artists etc. for the sake of exposure, we become our own worst enemies. It's like the real estate market. 

Your neighbor has a house identical to yours and they are each worth $200,000. He puts his house on the market for $150,000 because he wants to sell it quickly - guess what that does to all the houses around him? It brings their value down. Who would want to buy the house for $200k when they can get it for $150k? No one. So because one guy wanted to sell his house fast, he's screwed the value of everyone else's property. Don't be that guy, artist. Don't be that guy!

I know that on this website I post other writer's creative works as often as I can and I do pay them in exposure dollars. But that's only because I haven't anything else to give them at the moment. It's a mutual benefit because their work, links, and information are offered to my readers while my website is offered to their friends, family, and fans. I don't charge a penny for my time reviewing, posting, or advertising their work. And I don't make a penny from it either. See, I am repaid in exposure dollars, too. 

If I'm lucky enough to start earning sincere ad revenue to where I can take this website on full time and leave other work behind, then yes, I will definitely re-examine my rickety business model to compensate my contributors. That is a promise I make to you all right here and now. But until then, us little guys need to stick together and build together.

The bottom line - what I really want to tell all of your artists and creators out there - stop selling yourself short because even if you don't believe in your own value, respect the value of others. Stop giving your work away for free for the exposure you get from big names recognizing you. They are paid millions of dollars a year in advertising and you are helping them make that money. There is absolutely nothing wrong with being paid what you're worth. Like your mama always told you - don't give the shop away for free. 

Writing Prompt Fifty-Seven


Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
      • Public contact information you would like me to reference if your piece should be selected for feature.
        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
        • Optional: A photo of you
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

Writing Prompt Fifty-Six


Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
      • Public contact information you would like me to reference if your piece should be selected for feature.
        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
        • Optional: A photo of you
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

Extra! Extra! Read All About It!

It is with exceedingly great enthusiasm that I announce, officially, to the bloggerverse that my debut novel, Dust, is now available for pre-sale on Amazon US, Amazon UK, Kobo, Smashwords, and Apple! Order now for just $0.99 and have it delivered to your device on release day, March 9th!

Release Party

Join us for the online release party Wednesday March 9th, 2016 from 9:00AM - 8:00PM MST. It'll be a place to chat about the book, where you'd like to see yourself in the coming years, your goals and aspirations, and a chance to win one of two prizes! 

The grand prize winner will "go home" with a brand new Kindle while the second prize is loaded with all things Wyoming!

You won't want to miss out on this momentous event! Can't stay all day? That's OK! Just swing by throughout your busy schedule to say "HI!" and let use know what you're thinking!



See a full excerpt of Dust here!

Writing Prompt Fifty-Five


Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
      • Public contact information you would like me to reference if your piece should be selected for feature.
        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
        • Optional: A photo of you
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

Review: Red-Headed Woman

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

My apologies to any and all red headed women out there. This book does not paint you well at all. And in 1937, when the book was published, I'm sure plenty of auburn tresses were glared at while husbands' arms were tightly gripped.

Beware the red-headed home wrecker.

Lillian Andrews was a stunningly beautiful, red-headed woman born on the wrong side of the tracks. Beautiful and ambitious. So ambitious, in fact, we could label her a gold digger. It didn't take long for her to target her prize in the small town and acquire him through the art of seduction and youth. Starting off as William H. Legendre's secretary, she eventually wheedles her way into his fickle mind so much so that he divorces his wife, Irene, (a charming, subtle woman) and marries Lily instead. Then he realizes his mistake. The grass looked greener on the other side only for dear William to discover he moved into a swamp.

But all is not how she thought it would be. Rather than entertaining guests in her newly furnished, lavish household the neighbors travel across town to dinner at Irene's instead. At every turn she is shunned by the community and it vexes our anti-hero terribly. Perhaps the town is just too small for her, but will moving to a big city, sans her husband, save or destroy her? Will it give William and Irene a window to rekindle what was lost?

I can only offer three stars to the book because the character of Lillian is so detestable it's disappointing. I wanted to like her, to love her for her charisma and shamelessness in standing out amongst the humdrum crowd of the little town's aristocracy. But I couldn't. She destroys a marriage between two well paired people and then runs her husband into the ground. The author puts her into situations where I think we are supposed to feel bad for her, but we can't. There is nothing inherently good about her worth pitying. Honestly, the only person I felt sorry for was William. Irene was poised and strong enough to stand alone, but William was just stupid and naive, trapped in a situation chosen by the wrong brain... if you catch my drift.

Overall, the novel is well written, the characters round and fully developed, and the portrait of Lillian wholly convincing. On technicality alone it deserves five stars, but I simply just can't give it. I didn't enjoy the book as a leisurely read by any stretch of the imagination and when things did go wrong for Lillian I couldn't even enjoy them because it usually ended up biting William instead of her.

I'd like to be able to recommend this novel to others, but I'm not sure I can risk my reputation on it. Let's just say the read is... interesting.

Writing Prompt Fifty-Four

Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
      • Public contact information you would like me to reference if your piece should be selected for feature.
        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

Writing Prompt Fifty-Three

Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
      • Public contact information you would like me to reference if your piece should be selected for feature.
        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

Writing Prompt Fifty-Two

Guidelines:
Length: 800 words or less
Deadline: None
Submission: 
  • Submit via email to beauxcooper@gmail.com
  • Copy your story into the Message box:
    • Include:
      • "Writing Prompt #____"
      • Your return contact information marked with a "(P)" for private if applicable
      • Public contact information you would like me to reference if your piece should be selected for feature.
        • This can include your website or blog as well as your social media outlets: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, etc.
      • Your story
        • Please copy and paste into the body of the message, however, if you have a special format design for your story (such as moments of centered or right alignment, size, etc.) attachments are accepted.
Award: My favorite submissions will be featured on beauxcooper.com as well as all BC's social media outlets with all links connecting back to your blog/social media/website/etc.

Spotlight: Glads by Margaret Smith-Braniff


In response to Writing Prompt Forty-ThreeWe watered our horses in meadows beneath wildflower covered hillsides.

Miriam grabbed up Mirry, her five-year old granddaughter, and headed across the graveyard, filled with old stands of cottonwoods and clumps of lilac bushes—a few having been planted in right angles to the plots.

“It’s like a park, Mirry, this is where people come for reunions. Ooh, baby, I got to set you down. You’re growin’ like a weed.”

“You mean like the one we had at your house, Grammy?” The child trotted alongside her grandmother’s long stride. Her grandmother’s grip kept her from falling over tufts of uneven mounds. Gravesites were marked with various sizes and qualities of stone or metal markers, but the ground, though covered in grass, was not entirely smooth.

“Weeds? Oh, reunions. Well, kind of like that, honey. But sometimes we have reunions with friends and family members that we can’t really see.”

“Like ghosts?” The little girl’s steps faltered.

“Not exactly—at least not like you read in Goose Bumps. More like—well, you know when we sit on the sofa in the living room and look at the scrapbook of you and Melanie?”

“Yeah.”  The two of them continued toward the top of a hill, now walking on a graveled track for cars.

“Well, you know how I tell stories about you and Mel—like when you were so little you don’t remember too well.”

“I remember things.”

“Yes, I know you do, dear, but there are things you can’t remember because you weren’t there—Melanie was born before you but now you tell other people stories about her that you know because of the scrapbook.”

“You mean like when she won first prize for dressing Piggy up in a wool dress at that fair place?”

“Just like that.”

“So what’s that got to do with ghosts?”

“See that white marker over there?”

“Where? Oh, that one with the carving on it?”

“That one. It is where my Aunt Julie was buried. I come out here sometimes to have a chat with her about my flowerbeds. She used to have the most beautiful garden in town—there were purple glads and gorgeous fat red roses—“
“What’s a glad? I like that one, I bet. It sounds happy.”

“It is but it’s kind of stately—“

“What’s stately?”

“Tall and proud, like, I don’t know like these trees or—Mr. Meyer, you know that man that sits in church with us.”

“I know him.  He sneaks me candy sometimes when Mommy isn’t looking.”  Miriam smiled and nodded.

“He used to do that for your mommy too.”

“Anyway, a glad—gladiola—has long leaves and a stalk. Sometime this summer I’ll bring you out to see some. I planted some bulbs by Aunt Julie’s grave. They will start blooming this summer.”

“So why do you come and talk to Aunt Julie about flowers if she isn’t here anymore?

“That is an excellent question. It’s because she is ‘kind of’ here. She has a spirit—it left her body here, but she’s not really dead. I also come out here to talk to my own daddy. He and Momma are up here where we are going. They got to pick where they wanted to be buried a long time before lots of folks here did.”

“How come?”

“Well, because our family got here early. They wanted to be in a place that would remind all of us of how things started for all of us.”

“What do you mean?”

“Come up here and I’ll show you.” The long-legged grandmother in blue jeans and sweatshirt held tight to the hand of the five-year-old. She looked down. The child’s hair fluffed in the wind, her smooth cheeks rouged with the brisk air and exercise; her bright eyes scanned the scene below—a tan slope that dropped to a creek and then rose on the opposite side to a craggy red bluff. For a small person, Mirry didn’t seem bothered by the emptiness. Her grammy had something to show her and she would see it. Miriam smiled at the expectation. Someday Mirry might come visit her here—she hoped so.

“Look down toward this pasture, Mirry. I want you to think about the summer. Can you remember how green it was last summer?"

“Yes.”

“Well, once this pasture was green and full of wildflowers. Your great-grammy came here with your great-granddaddy. It was while their horses were watering in that creek down there that he asked her to get married to him. And she said yes.”

“So—were you there?” The little girl looked at her grandmother.
“Well—kind of yes. ‘Cause I’m here. Talking about them with you. So now you are there too.”

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Contact Margaret at:
or 
P.O. Box 1003
Buffalo, Wyoming 82834